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Protecting public art

Should a work of art worth big bucks be protected, even ring-fenced? Or should the public have free access to it, risking damage?
The New Paper - November 8, 2013
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Protecting public art

Should a work of art worth big bucks be protected, even ring-fenced? Or should the public have free access to it, risking damage?

On Saturday, a visitor climbed onto the one-storey-high metal safety netting at the Kinetic Rain sculpture at Changi Airport Terminal 1, picking off the sculpture’s metallic raindrops.

It is back in working order, but Changi Airport Group would not say how much it had to pay to repair the damage.
Like Kinetic Rain, some other public displays have been damaged recently.

Should access be limited, perhaps with a barrier so it’s clear that it’s “See, no touch”? No, said CAG.

The National Arts Council and National Heritage Board said public artworks are privately owned by venue owners, and are responsible for maintaining and monitoring the works.

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