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Entertainment, Food & Beverage

Hawkers cashing in on demand for festive goodies

Many stall owners switch to selling festive goodies for more income.
The Straits Times - February 9, 2013
By: Paige Lim and Debbie Lee
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Hawkers cashing in on demand for festive goodies Mr Anthony Tay and Ms Susan Yeo displaying their wares at their Tian Cheng Mei Shi stall. The store, which usually sells breakfast food, stacks its shelves with festive cookies during Chinese New Year. -- ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

FOR some hawkers, the lure of festive goodies is too hard to resist.

The owner of a Clementi hawker stall stopped selling satay three weeks ago, switching solely to the Chinese New Year delicacy ba kwa, as she has for 30 years.

Madam Seow Lai Hock, 56, owner of the Chai Ho Satay and Dried Pork stall at Clementi 448 Market and Food Centre, says it is the logical thing to do.

Her regular customers, used to the aroma of grilled satay wafting from her stall, have to make do with grilled meat of a different kind during this period.

Her son James Zhang, 30, said: "During this period, there is more demand for ba kwa than for satay."

HarriAnn's Delights, a chain which sells nyonya kueh, also switches this time of the year. It stopped making its kueh on Jan 28 to concentrate on Chinese New Year cookies instead.

"The money earned from Chinese New Year goodies will cover the loss of money from not selling nyonya kueh," said store captain Richard Tan, 60.

"Some people will ask about the nyonya kueh but we tell them we'll resume after the New Year," he said.

Even though many stalls sell these goodies, competition is not a problem. "We have regular customers who support us," said stall owner Anthony Tay, 64, of Tian Cheng Mei Shi at the Old Airport Road food centre.

The store, which usually sells breakfast food such as beehoon, stacks its shelves with festive cookies during Chinese New Year.

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