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Entertainment, Food & Beverage

Being a hawker is no easy job, say masters

BEING a hawker is not an easy job - the long hours and the heat are but some of the challenges hawkers face daily.
MyPaper - November 25, 2013
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Being a hawker is no easy job, say masters
BEING a hawker is not an easy job - the long hours and the heat are but some of the challenges hawkers face daily.
This is why it may be tough to get the next generation to take over the wok, said the newly crowned Hawker Masters.
Madam Zahara Abu Bakar, who runs mee rebus stall Selera Kita in Block 58, New Upper Changi Road, said: "It's a labour-intensive job and doesn't give you the income stability compared with office jobs.
"You also don't have the benefits of working in a company, and you have to be disciplined."
The 65-year-old was crowned a Singapore Hawker Master in the mee rebus category, along with five others recognised on Friday.
Now into its fourth year, the annual Singapore Hawker Masters awards, organised by The Straits Times and Lianhe Zaobao, celebrate the best hawkers here.
Another master, Mr Chua Poh Seng, 41, from Song Kee Fishball Noodle at 532 Upper Serangoon Road, said that being a hawker can be demanding on one's health. Still, he likes his job.
Said Mr Chua, who won the dry- and soup-fishball-noodles category: "There is a sense of achievement when I do my job well and my customers enjoy my food. I have also become friends with some of the regulars."

BEING a hawker is not an easy job - the long hours and the heat are but some of the challenges hawkers face daily.

 

This is why it may be tough to get the next generation to take over the wok, said the newly crowned Hawker Masters.

 

Madam Zahara Abu Bakar, who runs mee rebus stall Selera Kita in Block 58, New Upper Changi Road, said: "It's a labour-intensive job and doesn't give you the income stability compared with office jobs.

 

"You also don't have the benefits of working in a company, and you have to be disciplined."

 

The 65-year-old was crowned a Singapore Hawker Master in the mee rebus category, along with five others recognised on Friday.

 

Now into its fourth year, the annual Singapore Hawker Masters awards, organised by The Straits Times and Lianhe Zaobao, celebrate the best hawkers here.

 

Another master, Mr Chua Poh Seng, 41, from Song Kee Fishball Noodle at 532 Upper Serangoon Road, said that being a hawker can be demanding on one's health. Still, he likes his job.

 

Said Mr Chua, who won the dry- and soup-fishball-noodles category: "There is a sense of achievement when I do my job well and my customers enjoy my food. I have also become friends with some of the regulars."

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